Estate Planning in a World of Social Distancing

The truth is that we’re living in a world of uncertainty that impacts every area of our life. Unfortunately, the fears that arise in the face of a viral pandemic do not erase the need for a careful estate planning. As restrictions on social mobility increase, it’s still possible to get answers to your planning questions in a safe way.

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More than a year ago, our law firm adopted digital technology that allows every member of our team to assist you, as needed, by video. Our Zoom video conference platform allows us to conduct virtual face-to-face meetings with you or other members of your family with ease no matter where they are located.

To participate by video, you don’t need much more than a smartphone, tablet, laptop or PC equipped with a camera and microphone. In real time, we can review any estate planning documents already on file in our system or to review drafts of new planning documents.

With forced time at home, it’s a good time to review your estate planning. In our current circumstances, we recommend, at a minimum, that you have a well-crafted General Durable Power of Attorney. Because of the pressure on the medical system, it’s probably best that your Power of Attorney be one that is effective immediately rather than a springing power the requires confirmation of your incapacity by a physician.

In addition, I recommend that you review your Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care, Advanced Directive or Living Will, if you have one. Under Michigan law, this important document allows you to appoint a Patient Advocate to make your medical treatment decisions if you are unable to make such decisions for yourself.

If you already have a revocable living trust in place you may want to consider adding an additional trustee to your plan right now, rather than waiting until receipt of incapacity or death to allow someone else you trust to make financial or medical decisions.

If you need someone else to aide with banking or other financial decisions, I urge you to resist the temptation to add other people as joint owners on your bank accounts or investments. With proper legal documents in place, taking the short cut of joint tenancy risks a serious loss of control over what you own.

Although the Michigan Uniform Electronic Transactions Act (UETA) law allows use of electronic signatures for business transactions, it excludes use of electronic signatures for wills, codicils or testamentary trusts. Unless additional legal relief is provided, most estate planning documents still must be signed and witnessed the old-fashioned way with pen on paper. We’ve created several options to allow you to get your Power of Attorney, health care directive or other necessary documents updated quickly and cost-effectively.

If you have questions or concerns about your current planning needs, please give us a call at (231) 799-4994. Or, drop us a note using the form below. We’re still here to help.

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